Event Title

The Effects of Feedforward Self-modeling on Self-Efficacy Beliefs

Presenter Information

Kaylie Balvaneda

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Major

Kinesiology

Category

Health, Nutrition and Clinical Studies

Session Number

03

Location

RM 217

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Amanda Rymal

Juror Names

Salome Mshigeni, Codi Lazar, Benjamin Becerra

Start Date

5-16-2019 1:00 PM

End Date

5-16-2019 1:20 PM

Abstract

An abundance of research has investigated the relationship between self-as-a-model techniques and the effects on one’s self-efficacy (see McCullagh et al., 2012). Of specific interest here is the feedforward self-modeling technique (FF; i.e., viewing oneself perform at levels not yet achieved using edited video). Within the FF technique, one could produce a mirror image of a skill to demonstrate an individual performing that skill on the contralateral side of the actual performance. One way a FF technique could boost performance is through altered self-efficacy beliefs. FF techniques could boost self-efficacy beliefs through the past performance and vicarious experience mechanisms outlined in the self-efficacy theory. To our knowledge, the effects of FF self-modeling in the form of mirror reversal (FF-MR) on one’s self-efficacy beliefs has not been investigated. Thus, this research examined the effects of (FF-MR) on basketball free throw self-efficacy for the non-dominant hand. Participants (n = 26) participated in four sessions (baseline, two intervention days, and retention) over a four-week period. During each session, participants completed 10 free throw shots with their non-dominant hand and completed the self-efficacy questionnaire. FF-MR videos were viewed during the two intervention phases. A RM-ANOVA was conducted. Results indicated a significant main effect for time (F(3, 75) = 3.95, p = 0.01, eta = 0.14, power = 0.81). The results suggest that the use of FF-MR videos increased self-efficacy beliefs of a free throw performance of the non-dominant hand. Practical application of results along with strengths and weaknesses will be discussed.

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May 16th, 1:00 PM May 16th, 1:20 PM

The Effects of Feedforward Self-modeling on Self-Efficacy Beliefs

RM 217

An abundance of research has investigated the relationship between self-as-a-model techniques and the effects on one’s self-efficacy (see McCullagh et al., 2012). Of specific interest here is the feedforward self-modeling technique (FF; i.e., viewing oneself perform at levels not yet achieved using edited video). Within the FF technique, one could produce a mirror image of a skill to demonstrate an individual performing that skill on the contralateral side of the actual performance. One way a FF technique could boost performance is through altered self-efficacy beliefs. FF techniques could boost self-efficacy beliefs through the past performance and vicarious experience mechanisms outlined in the self-efficacy theory. To our knowledge, the effects of FF self-modeling in the form of mirror reversal (FF-MR) on one’s self-efficacy beliefs has not been investigated. Thus, this research examined the effects of (FF-MR) on basketball free throw self-efficacy for the non-dominant hand. Participants (n = 26) participated in four sessions (baseline, two intervention days, and retention) over a four-week period. During each session, participants completed 10 free throw shots with their non-dominant hand and completed the self-efficacy questionnaire. FF-MR videos were viewed during the two intervention phases. A RM-ANOVA was conducted. Results indicated a significant main effect for time (F(3, 75) = 3.95, p = 0.01, eta = 0.14, power = 0.81). The results suggest that the use of FF-MR videos increased self-efficacy beliefs of a free throw performance of the non-dominant hand. Practical application of results along with strengths and weaknesses will be discussed.