Event Title

Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D-4) can Chelate Lithium Ions from Aqueous Solutions

Presenter Information

Jacqueline Lamas

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Location

SMSU Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kimberly Cousins

Start Date

5-16-2019 9:30 AM

End Date

5-16-2019 11:00 AM

Abstract

Lithium in seawater is a new reserve to supply lithium, which is used widely for battery manufacturing. We propose a method to extract lithium from ocean waters using a clear liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D-4). D-4 shows an exclusive affinity for lithium ions due to its crown ether-like structure, making it the ideal substance to use for lithium ion extractions from aqueous solutions. We used one milliliter of D-4 to fifty milliliters of a lithium chloride solution ( 1.0 x 10-5 M and 1.0X10-4 M) to perform the extractions using separatory funnels. Vacuum distillation was used to recycle and purify D-4 leaving lithium behind as the byproduct. We used our FTIR, AA and NMR instruments for analysis on the distilled D-4 and the extracted lithium chloride solutions. Results indicate that D-4 already contains lithium ions as a new store bought product; it attracts lithium ions when being synthesized. This new finding further signifies D-4’s potential for a lithium ion extraction.

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May 16th, 9:30 AM May 16th, 11:00 AM

Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D-4) can Chelate Lithium Ions from Aqueous Solutions

SMSU Event Center BC

Lithium in seawater is a new reserve to supply lithium, which is used widely for battery manufacturing. We propose a method to extract lithium from ocean waters using a clear liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D-4). D-4 shows an exclusive affinity for lithium ions due to its crown ether-like structure, making it the ideal substance to use for lithium ion extractions from aqueous solutions. We used one milliliter of D-4 to fifty milliliters of a lithium chloride solution ( 1.0 x 10-5 M and 1.0X10-4 M) to perform the extractions using separatory funnels. Vacuum distillation was used to recycle and purify D-4 leaving lithium behind as the byproduct. We used our FTIR, AA and NMR instruments for analysis on the distilled D-4 and the extracted lithium chloride solutions. Results indicate that D-4 already contains lithium ions as a new store bought product; it attracts lithium ions when being synthesized. This new finding further signifies D-4’s potential for a lithium ion extraction.