Event Title

Fostering College Access along the Education Pipeline for Students of Color

Presenter Information

Hector Garcia
Yesenia Casas

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Major

Psychology

Category

Behavioral and Social Sciences

Session Number

04

Location

RM 218

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Nancy Acevedo-Gil

Juror Names

Nerea Marteache, Erica Lizano, Arianna Huhn

Start Date

5-16-2019 1:20 PM

End Date

5-16-2019 1:40 PM

Abstract

Previous studies have established a gap in the level of academic research resources available to schools with high populations of Students of Color (Oakes, 2004; Rogers, et al., 2010). Schools with high percentage of African American and Latina/o students are overcrowded, lack qualified teachers, and "are more likely to have shortages of college preparation teachers and advanced placement classes" (Rogers, et al., 2010, p. 7). A lack of resources contributes to Students of Color having limited access to college preparation curricula and college information (Oakes, et al., 2006; Zarate & Gallimore, 2005). Therefore, our team engaged in three projects, all focused on college access for Students of Color in the Inland Empire. The first was a community-based autoethnographic study, the second was writing a manuscript that examined college choices nationwide, and the third was developing a manuscript that researched the access to college guidance for community college students. Our SRP began with engaging in a community-based autoethnograpic project that aimed to support students in their critical transitions from elementary school to middle school and as incoming high school seniors. The project culminated in developing a college-going curriculum tailored for fifth grade and twelfth grade students aim to equip student participants with the knowledge to navigate a college-going pathway. The second project entailed developing a journal manuscript from descriptive quantitative data to examine college choices nationwide, disaggregated by race, gender, and state. The third project used semi-structured interviews to examine the access to college guidance for Latina/o/x community college students.

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May 16th, 1:20 PM May 16th, 1:40 PM

Fostering College Access along the Education Pipeline for Students of Color

RM 218

Previous studies have established a gap in the level of academic research resources available to schools with high populations of Students of Color (Oakes, 2004; Rogers, et al., 2010). Schools with high percentage of African American and Latina/o students are overcrowded, lack qualified teachers, and "are more likely to have shortages of college preparation teachers and advanced placement classes" (Rogers, et al., 2010, p. 7). A lack of resources contributes to Students of Color having limited access to college preparation curricula and college information (Oakes, et al., 2006; Zarate & Gallimore, 2005). Therefore, our team engaged in three projects, all focused on college access for Students of Color in the Inland Empire. The first was a community-based autoethnographic study, the second was writing a manuscript that examined college choices nationwide, and the third was developing a manuscript that researched the access to college guidance for community college students. Our SRP began with engaging in a community-based autoethnograpic project that aimed to support students in their critical transitions from elementary school to middle school and as incoming high school seniors. The project culminated in developing a college-going curriculum tailored for fifth grade and twelfth grade students aim to equip student participants with the knowledge to navigate a college-going pathway. The second project entailed developing a journal manuscript from descriptive quantitative data to examine college choices nationwide, disaggregated by race, gender, and state. The third project used semi-structured interviews to examine the access to college guidance for Latina/o/x community college students.