Event Title

Multicompetence, Multiple Intelligences, and First-Year Composition Students

Presenter Information

Patricia Rice-Daniels

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Major

English

Language, Literacy and Culture

Category

Education, Humanities and Letters

Session Number

12

Location

RM 216

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Caroline Vickers

Juror Names

Jemma Kim, Maria Pares, Jacqueline Romano

Start Date

5-16-2019 5:10 PM

End Date

5-16-2019 5:30 PM

Abstract

Cognitive-based developments for teaching/learning languages and writing are virtually unlimited realms of research and study. This study is an effort to dip into this realm with an exposition of cognitive approaches and perspectives involving differences and similarities between monolingual and bilingual first-year composition (FYC) students. Initially, this project was prompted by Vivian Cook’s 1999 argument that some SLA educators and researchers unfairly differentiate between monolingual and bilingual/multilingual students. Hence, this project contains a statement of the problem, the purpose for this study, and some general background information of two featured theorists. In particular, the concepts, herein, are cognitive-based, language-based, student-based and student-centered. Also, in defense of some SLA inferences, this project involves empirical results that indicate differences and similarities of competent and multicompetent aspects among bilingual and monolingual FYC college students.

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May 16th, 5:10 PM May 16th, 5:30 PM

Multicompetence, Multiple Intelligences, and First-Year Composition Students

RM 216

Cognitive-based developments for teaching/learning languages and writing are virtually unlimited realms of research and study. This study is an effort to dip into this realm with an exposition of cognitive approaches and perspectives involving differences and similarities between monolingual and bilingual first-year composition (FYC) students. Initially, this project was prompted by Vivian Cook’s 1999 argument that some SLA educators and researchers unfairly differentiate between monolingual and bilingual/multilingual students. Hence, this project contains a statement of the problem, the purpose for this study, and some general background information of two featured theorists. In particular, the concepts, herein, are cognitive-based, language-based, student-based and student-centered. Also, in defense of some SLA inferences, this project involves empirical results that indicate differences and similarities of competent and multicompetent aspects among bilingual and monolingual FYC college students.