Event Title

Subtle Sexism’s Impact on Women’s Self Perceptions of Career Outcomes

Presenter Information

Amanda Bain

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mark Agars

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

This study examines subtle sexism’s impact on working women’s self-perceptions via survey. Specifically, women’s self-perceptions of career outcomes, job fit and turnover intentions. Although overt sexism has decreased substantially in the workplace more subtle forms of sexism are prominent and result in adverse impact for women. Subtle sexism is defined as intentional or unintentional actions or behaviors toward social minorities that convey ambiguous intent. This is harmful and results in adverse impact for women in the workplace. The overall impact of these subtle forms of sexism on women’s self-perceptions is not understood. However, women’s self-perceptions impact their work performance thus affecting their workplace outcomes. We hypothesize that women who have experienced higher levels of subtle sexism will have lower self-perceptions, explicitly self-perceptions of workplace outcomes and that resiliency will moderate the relationship. The data and findings will be collected this spring.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Subtle Sexism’s Impact on Women’s Self Perceptions of Career Outcomes

Event Center BC

This study examines subtle sexism’s impact on working women’s self-perceptions via survey. Specifically, women’s self-perceptions of career outcomes, job fit and turnover intentions. Although overt sexism has decreased substantially in the workplace more subtle forms of sexism are prominent and result in adverse impact for women. Subtle sexism is defined as intentional or unintentional actions or behaviors toward social minorities that convey ambiguous intent. This is harmful and results in adverse impact for women in the workplace. The overall impact of these subtle forms of sexism on women’s self-perceptions is not understood. However, women’s self-perceptions impact their work performance thus affecting their workplace outcomes. We hypothesize that women who have experienced higher levels of subtle sexism will have lower self-perceptions, explicitly self-perceptions of workplace outcomes and that resiliency will moderate the relationship. The data and findings will be collected this spring.