Event Title

Measuring Metacognition: A Comparative Validity Study of the Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment

Presenter Information

Ryan Radmall

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Session Number

2

Location

RM 216

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Janet Kottke

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Guillermo Escalante

Start Date

5-19-2016 3:20 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 3:40 PM

Abstract

The construct of metacognition has appeared in psychological literature dating back to the early 1970’s. However, the conceptualization of this construct has undergone important changes in the last 45 years as more precise measurement methods have emerged and research has expanded understanding of metacognition. As a result of previous research, metacognition has been considered mainly in terms of cognitive processes. However, one noteworthy aspect of metacognition that has yet to be explored is the behavioral indicators of metacognition. The current study attempted to provide convergent validity to a recently developed metacognition measure that focuses on behaviors rather than cognition. In doing so, three scales, two of which have been psychometrically established, were utilized to measure metacognition in terms of cognitive processes, behavioral indicators, and the relationship between the need for cognition and metacognition. Findings support the idea that metacognition consists of both behavioral and cognitive processes, and metacognition is negatively related to cognition. Implications of these findings, directions for future research, and limitations of the present study are discussed herein.

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May 19th, 3:20 PM May 19th, 3:40 PM

Measuring Metacognition: A Comparative Validity Study of the Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment

RM 216

The construct of metacognition has appeared in psychological literature dating back to the early 1970’s. However, the conceptualization of this construct has undergone important changes in the last 45 years as more precise measurement methods have emerged and research has expanded understanding of metacognition. As a result of previous research, metacognition has been considered mainly in terms of cognitive processes. However, one noteworthy aspect of metacognition that has yet to be explored is the behavioral indicators of metacognition. The current study attempted to provide convergent validity to a recently developed metacognition measure that focuses on behaviors rather than cognition. In doing so, three scales, two of which have been psychometrically established, were utilized to measure metacognition in terms of cognitive processes, behavioral indicators, and the relationship between the need for cognition and metacognition. Findings support the idea that metacognition consists of both behavioral and cognitive processes, and metacognition is negatively related to cognition. Implications of these findings, directions for future research, and limitations of the present study are discussed herein.