Event Title

Examining the Relationship between Perceived Weight Stigma and Unhealthy Eating Behavior

Presenter Information

Ashlee Pardo

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

SMSU Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Joseph Wellman

Start Date

5-17-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

5-17-2018 11:00 AM

Abstract

Fear and stigmatization are often used as motivators for individuals to lose weight or eat healthfully. However, this strategy has been shown to be counterproductive and can lead individuals to actually gain weight. In the present study, we examined the relationship between weight-based stigmatization, fear of fat (FoF), perceived control, and eating behavior in a diverse undergraduate sample (N=647, 69.2% Latina/o, 74.8 % Female). Results showed that perceptions of weight stigma were associated with increased binge eating (b=2.67, p<.001), restrained eating (b=.15, p<.01), and emotional eating (b=.28, p<.01). FoF and perceived control were found to be significant mediators of these relationships. These findings have important implications for our understanding of weight stigma and its consequences for eating behavior. The current research would suggest that campaigns which stigmatize individuals may be counterproductive.

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May 17th, 9:30 AM May 17th, 11:00 AM

Examining the Relationship between Perceived Weight Stigma and Unhealthy Eating Behavior

SMSU Event Center BC

Fear and stigmatization are often used as motivators for individuals to lose weight or eat healthfully. However, this strategy has been shown to be counterproductive and can lead individuals to actually gain weight. In the present study, we examined the relationship between weight-based stigmatization, fear of fat (FoF), perceived control, and eating behavior in a diverse undergraduate sample (N=647, 69.2% Latina/o, 74.8 % Female). Results showed that perceptions of weight stigma were associated with increased binge eating (b=2.67, p<.001), restrained eating (b=.15, p<.01), and emotional eating (b=.28, p<.01). FoF and perceived control were found to be significant mediators of these relationships. These findings have important implications for our understanding of weight stigma and its consequences for eating behavior. The current research would suggest that campaigns which stigmatize individuals may be counterproductive.