Event Title

Is the Relationship between Trait Mindfulness and Psychological Outcomes Indirect?

Presenter Information

Sailesh Maharjan

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Michael R. Lewin

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

Mindfulness meditation and related practices are increasingly popular with a large number of people and have been incorporated into many western psychotherapies (e.g., Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy). There is considerable debate over whether mindfulness is best studied as a state, trait or procedure. Although many studies have found that trait and state mindfulness is related to healthy physical and mental health outcomes, less is known about the mechanism(s) through which mindfulness (purposeful attention with acceptance or nonjudgment) enhances health outcomes. The current study explored the role of potential mediators of the relationship between trait mindfulness and the psychological outcomes of psychological distress. Specifically, we examined whether the relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological outcomes was indirect, with mediators such as emotion regulation, experiential avoidance, cognitive flexibility, and acceptance accounting for the relationship. We measured mindfulness, psychological distress, emotion regulation, cognitive flexibility, experiential avoidance and acceptance in a large sample of undergraduate students. The analyses suggested that enhanced psychological flexibility intervened the relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological outcomes. Results have implications for enhancing treatment packages that include mindfulness practices. Limitations of the use of trait mindfulness versus the state of mindfulness were discussed.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Is the Relationship between Trait Mindfulness and Psychological Outcomes Indirect?

Event Center BC

Mindfulness meditation and related practices are increasingly popular with a large number of people and have been incorporated into many western psychotherapies (e.g., Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy). There is considerable debate over whether mindfulness is best studied as a state, trait or procedure. Although many studies have found that trait and state mindfulness is related to healthy physical and mental health outcomes, less is known about the mechanism(s) through which mindfulness (purposeful attention with acceptance or nonjudgment) enhances health outcomes. The current study explored the role of potential mediators of the relationship between trait mindfulness and the psychological outcomes of psychological distress. Specifically, we examined whether the relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological outcomes was indirect, with mediators such as emotion regulation, experiential avoidance, cognitive flexibility, and acceptance accounting for the relationship. We measured mindfulness, psychological distress, emotion regulation, cognitive flexibility, experiential avoidance and acceptance in a large sample of undergraduate students. The analyses suggested that enhanced psychological flexibility intervened the relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological outcomes. Results have implications for enhancing treatment packages that include mindfulness practices. Limitations of the use of trait mindfulness versus the state of mindfulness were discussed.