Event Title

Exposure to Weight Stigmatizing Images Leads to Choosing Higher Calorie Foods

Presenter Information

Natasha Dixon
Eric Berru

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Joseph D. Wellman

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

The overweight are consistently presented in the media as lazy, sloppy and unintelligent. Previous research has suggested that weight stigma and fear of fat (FoF) may increase eating behavior and weight gain among these individuals. We examined how weight stigmatizing images and FoF influence calorie selection among lean and heavyweight individuals (BMI: Study 1). In Study 2, we examined individuals who perceive themselves to be overweight. Participants were randomly assigned to view stigmatizing images of the overweight, non-stigmatizing images of the overweight, or neutral images (i.e., objects). They then reviewed a restaurant menu and selected items they would like to eat. Finally, participants completed measures of perceived weight stigma and FoF. Results indicate that the more overweight participants feared fat, the more calories they ordered in the stigmatizing condition. The opposite pattern was observed among average weight individuals in the stigmatizing condition. Findings are discussed from a resource depletion perspective.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Exposure to Weight Stigmatizing Images Leads to Choosing Higher Calorie Foods

Event Center BC

The overweight are consistently presented in the media as lazy, sloppy and unintelligent. Previous research has suggested that weight stigma and fear of fat (FoF) may increase eating behavior and weight gain among these individuals. We examined how weight stigmatizing images and FoF influence calorie selection among lean and heavyweight individuals (BMI: Study 1). In Study 2, we examined individuals who perceive themselves to be overweight. Participants were randomly assigned to view stigmatizing images of the overweight, non-stigmatizing images of the overweight, or neutral images (i.e., objects). They then reviewed a restaurant menu and selected items they would like to eat. Finally, participants completed measures of perceived weight stigma and FoF. Results indicate that the more overweight participants feared fat, the more calories they ordered in the stigmatizing condition. The opposite pattern was observed among average weight individuals in the stigmatizing condition. Findings are discussed from a resource depletion perspective.