Event Title

Role of NPY on Cannabinoid-Induced Anxiety-Like Behavior

Presenter Information

David Sanchez

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cynthia Crawford

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

Increased cannabis accessibility and use has resulted from recent changes in state laws. These laws were adopted based on our understanding of cannabis effects from research conducted twenty to thirty years ago. Unfortunately, the cannabis now being sold for recreationally and medical purposes contains a greater Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content and much lower cannabidiol (CBD) content than cannabis available in the past. Because THC is the primary psychoactive agent in cannabis and is responsible for its rewarding and addicting properties, it is very possible that the cannabis presently being sold will have a much greater effect on neuronal functioning. Moreover, the lower content of CBD which acts as an indirect antagonist of THC also adds to the greater psychoactive effects of cannabis. These changes in cannabis are particularly concerning as high school students in the United States now report smoking cannabis more often than nicotine products. One particular effect of cannabis that will likely be enhanced by these changes in the chemical makeup of the drug, is its effect on affective behavior. Specifically, THC is believed to be anxiety-inducing while CBD is anxiolytic suggesting that using high THC/low CBD cannabis will lead to greater anxiety. Therefore, the present study will assess the effect of repeated and chronic exposure during adolescence to the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55,940 (a synthetic analog of THC) and/or CBD on anxiety-like behavior in young adult rats. To this end, we measured anxiety-like behavior using both an elevated plus maze and the light/dark box.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Role of NPY on Cannabinoid-Induced Anxiety-Like Behavior

Event Center BC

Increased cannabis accessibility and use has resulted from recent changes in state laws. These laws were adopted based on our understanding of cannabis effects from research conducted twenty to thirty years ago. Unfortunately, the cannabis now being sold for recreationally and medical purposes contains a greater Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content and much lower cannabidiol (CBD) content than cannabis available in the past. Because THC is the primary psychoactive agent in cannabis and is responsible for its rewarding and addicting properties, it is very possible that the cannabis presently being sold will have a much greater effect on neuronal functioning. Moreover, the lower content of CBD which acts as an indirect antagonist of THC also adds to the greater psychoactive effects of cannabis. These changes in cannabis are particularly concerning as high school students in the United States now report smoking cannabis more often than nicotine products. One particular effect of cannabis that will likely be enhanced by these changes in the chemical makeup of the drug, is its effect on affective behavior. Specifically, THC is believed to be anxiety-inducing while CBD is anxiolytic suggesting that using high THC/low CBD cannabis will lead to greater anxiety. Therefore, the present study will assess the effect of repeated and chronic exposure during adolescence to the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55,940 (a synthetic analog of THC) and/or CBD on anxiety-like behavior in young adult rats. To this end, we measured anxiety-like behavior using both an elevated plus maze and the light/dark box.