Event Title

Monitoring Tectonic Plate Motion near Desert Hot Springs California

Presenter Information

Travis Buenting

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Geological Sciences

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sally McGill

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

This study uses elastic modeling of GPS measurements to estimate slip rates of major faults along the Pacific-North American plate boundary, near Desert Hot Springs, California. This study applies velocities for 7 new sites that have not been included in any previous modeling studies, as well as updated velocities for a number of other sites. For the Banning and Mission Creek strands of the San Andreas, the bestfitting slip rates were calculated to be 15 mm/yr and 0 mm/yr, respectively, but other acceptable models had a combined slip rate for these two faults that ranged between 0-29 mm/yr. For other faults, the best-fitting model yielded slip rates of 9.6 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault, 7.5 mm/yr for the Newport-Inglewood fault, 6.5 mm/yr for the Elsinore fault, and Emerson fault: 0-6 mm/ yr, and the 7.5 mm/yr and a total of 8.8 mm/yr across four faults in the Eastern California Shear Zone.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Monitoring Tectonic Plate Motion near Desert Hot Springs California

Event Center BC

This study uses elastic modeling of GPS measurements to estimate slip rates of major faults along the Pacific-North American plate boundary, near Desert Hot Springs, California. This study applies velocities for 7 new sites that have not been included in any previous modeling studies, as well as updated velocities for a number of other sites. For the Banning and Mission Creek strands of the San Andreas, the bestfitting slip rates were calculated to be 15 mm/yr and 0 mm/yr, respectively, but other acceptable models had a combined slip rate for these two faults that ranged between 0-29 mm/yr. For other faults, the best-fitting model yielded slip rates of 9.6 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault, 7.5 mm/yr for the Newport-Inglewood fault, 6.5 mm/yr for the Elsinore fault, and Emerson fault: 0-6 mm/ yr, and the 7.5 mm/yr and a total of 8.8 mm/yr across four faults in the Eastern California Shear Zone.