Event Title

Comparing Smart Apparel Muscle Activity Measurements to Surface Electromyography During Exercise

Presenter Information

Jonathan Aquino

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Kinesiology

Location

Event Center BC

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare smart apparel (SA) muscle activity measurements to surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements during exercise, and determine if any systematic bias of the apparel exists. Methods: Thirty-five male participants (Ages 23.1±2.92 yrs, Height 178±0.09 cm, Mass 81.14±10.59 kg, body fat percentage 15.44.79%) provided informed consent to participate. During two testing sessions on two separate days, participants performed a three-minute standardized warm-up, followed by maximal voluntary contractions for selected muscles. Subsequently, participants performed three sets of 12 bodyweight squats and pushups. Conditions (sEMG or SA) were randomly counterbalanced among participants. Percent of maximal voluntary contractions (%MVC) were calculated for the selected muscle groups. Paired t-test were used to analyze group mean differences in %MVC between conditions. Bland & Altman plots were created to determine if any systematic bias exists. A Pearson’s product correlation was run to determine if there was an association with intertrial variability and body fat percentage. Results: There were no significant differences between %MVC in the SA and sEMG for the RPEC, RQUAD, and RHAM muscles, as well as no significant correlation between intertrial variability and body fat percentage (p> 0.05). There was a significant difference in %MVC measured in the SA and sEMG for the RDELT (p= 0.02). Conclusion: While there is no significant difference in %MVC in RPEC, RQUAD, and RDELT, there was a significant difference in %MVC for RDELT. It appears no systematic bias is present and intertrial differences are not associated with body fat percentage.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Comparing Smart Apparel Muscle Activity Measurements to Surface Electromyography During Exercise

Event Center BC

Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare smart apparel (SA) muscle activity measurements to surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements during exercise, and determine if any systematic bias of the apparel exists. Methods: Thirty-five male participants (Ages 23.1±2.92 yrs, Height 178±0.09 cm, Mass 81.14±10.59 kg, body fat percentage 15.44.79%) provided informed consent to participate. During two testing sessions on two separate days, participants performed a three-minute standardized warm-up, followed by maximal voluntary contractions for selected muscles. Subsequently, participants performed three sets of 12 bodyweight squats and pushups. Conditions (sEMG or SA) were randomly counterbalanced among participants. Percent of maximal voluntary contractions (%MVC) were calculated for the selected muscle groups. Paired t-test were used to analyze group mean differences in %MVC between conditions. Bland & Altman plots were created to determine if any systematic bias exists. A Pearson’s product correlation was run to determine if there was an association with intertrial variability and body fat percentage. Results: There were no significant differences between %MVC in the SA and sEMG for the RPEC, RQUAD, and RHAM muscles, as well as no significant correlation between intertrial variability and body fat percentage (p> 0.05). There was a significant difference in %MVC measured in the SA and sEMG for the RDELT (p= 0.02). Conclusion: While there is no significant difference in %MVC in RPEC, RQUAD, and RDELT, there was a significant difference in %MVC for RDELT. It appears no systematic bias is present and intertrial differences are not associated with body fat percentage.