Event Title

Effects of Perceptual Load on a Simon Task

Presenter Information

David Buitron

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Hideya Koshino

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

Perceptual load (PL) hypothesis claims that PL determines attentional selection. We questioned whether the PL effect can be generalized to other interference tasks, such as a Simon task. Participants performed a discrimination task with three levels of PL (No PL, Low PL, and High PL). There were four stimuli arranged in a horizontal fashion, and a target appeared at a near or far location from the fixation. In our previous study with a letter discrimination task, there were Simon effects for the No PL and Low PL, but not for High PL conditions. In the present study, we used a color discrimination task, and basically replicated our previous results, that there were Simon effects for No and low PL regardless of stimulus distance from the fixation. However, there was a Simon effect for high PL for far condition. The results suggest that stimulus discriminability affects the magnitude of the Simon effect.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Effects of Perceptual Load on a Simon Task

Event Center BC

Perceptual load (PL) hypothesis claims that PL determines attentional selection. We questioned whether the PL effect can be generalized to other interference tasks, such as a Simon task. Participants performed a discrimination task with three levels of PL (No PL, Low PL, and High PL). There were four stimuli arranged in a horizontal fashion, and a target appeared at a near or far location from the fixation. In our previous study with a letter discrimination task, there were Simon effects for the No PL and Low PL, but not for High PL conditions. In the present study, we used a color discrimination task, and basically replicated our previous results, that there were Simon effects for No and low PL regardless of stimulus distance from the fixation. However, there was a Simon effect for high PL for far condition. The results suggest that stimulus discriminability affects the magnitude of the Simon effect.