Event Title

Can All Your Shots Come True? A Comparison Of SelfModeling Techniques On Free Throw Performance

Presenter Information

Karah Shouse

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Kinesiology

Session Number

2

Location

RM 215

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mandy Rymal

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Jason Ng

Start Date

5-18-2017 2:50 PM

End Date

5-18-2017 3:10 PM

Abstract

Research has displayed that athletes, coaches, and practitioners use observation as a means to convey information to aid in the learning of motor skills. A specific form of observation, as well as the field of interest in this research study, is self-modeling. Selfmodeling is an instructional technique in which one views them self on video showing only desired behavior (Dowrick, 1999). In this research we focused on whether mirror reversal of the dominant arm, which appeared as though it is the non-dominant arm, or an unedited video of the non-dominant arm showing the individual’s best performance (i.e., positive self-review) had an effect on free throw success. Participants were assigned to either the positive self–review (PSR) group, mirror reversal (MR) group, or control (C) group. The primary study aim was to assess the effectiveness of different types of self-modeling with regards to performance. Participants (n = 81) took part in a four week protocol in which their free throw performance was measured; baseline, acquisition one, acquisition two, and retention. Results showed that there was a significant main effect for time ([F(1,2) =6.037], p = .001, η₂= 0.72, β-1 = 0.957]), due to a learning effect. However, there were no significant main effect with regards to the group and no significant interactions. Based on the results, it was concluded that different types of self-observation had no effect on free throw performance. Limitations and future considerations will be discussed.

Share

COinS
 
May 18th, 2:50 PM May 18th, 3:10 PM

Can All Your Shots Come True? A Comparison Of SelfModeling Techniques On Free Throw Performance

RM 215

Research has displayed that athletes, coaches, and practitioners use observation as a means to convey information to aid in the learning of motor skills. A specific form of observation, as well as the field of interest in this research study, is self-modeling. Selfmodeling is an instructional technique in which one views them self on video showing only desired behavior (Dowrick, 1999). In this research we focused on whether mirror reversal of the dominant arm, which appeared as though it is the non-dominant arm, or an unedited video of the non-dominant arm showing the individual’s best performance (i.e., positive self-review) had an effect on free throw success. Participants were assigned to either the positive self–review (PSR) group, mirror reversal (MR) group, or control (C) group. The primary study aim was to assess the effectiveness of different types of self-modeling with regards to performance. Participants (n = 81) took part in a four week protocol in which their free throw performance was measured; baseline, acquisition one, acquisition two, and retention. Results showed that there was a significant main effect for time ([F(1,2) =6.037], p = .001, η₂= 0.72, β-1 = 0.957]), due to a learning effect. However, there were no significant main effect with regards to the group and no significant interactions. Based on the results, it was concluded that different types of self-observation had no effect on free throw performance. Limitations and future considerations will be discussed.