Event Title

The Hub Effect: Airline Hubs as Facilitators of Theft from Passengers’ Luggage?

Presenter Information

Tristen Cooper

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

National Security Studies

Location

Event Center A & B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Nera Marteache

Start Date

5-19-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

Pilferage from air passengers’ luggage by airport employees is often reported in the news and causes concern among travelers. It is an indicator of vulnerability in the aviation network: If offenders have access to passengers’ luggage to steal items from them, that access can also be used to transport drugs, stolen goods, explosives, etc. Therefore, it is very important to know where those thefts happen, and why they happen most at certain airports. Previous research findings show that smaller airports seem to be riskier. However, these results only take into account the origin and final destination airports of each trip, disregarding the layovers in between connecting flights, or how airports are connected to one another. This study will focus on the role of “hubs” (a transfer point used by the airlines to facilitate transport to/from various smaller destinations) and airport interconnectivity as facilitators of crime. Social Network Analysis will be used to modulate theft rates depending on the relative importance of each airport in the commercial aviation network of the U.S.

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May 19th, 1:00 PM May 19th, 2:30 PM

The Hub Effect: Airline Hubs as Facilitators of Theft from Passengers’ Luggage?

Event Center A & B

Pilferage from air passengers’ luggage by airport employees is often reported in the news and causes concern among travelers. It is an indicator of vulnerability in the aviation network: If offenders have access to passengers’ luggage to steal items from them, that access can also be used to transport drugs, stolen goods, explosives, etc. Therefore, it is very important to know where those thefts happen, and why they happen most at certain airports. Previous research findings show that smaller airports seem to be riskier. However, these results only take into account the origin and final destination airports of each trip, disregarding the layovers in between connecting flights, or how airports are connected to one another. This study will focus on the role of “hubs” (a transfer point used by the airlines to facilitate transport to/from various smaller destinations) and airport interconnectivity as facilitators of crime. Social Network Analysis will be used to modulate theft rates depending on the relative importance of each airport in the commercial aviation network of the U.S.