Event Title

Does Love Impact Athletic Performance?

Presenter Information

Luca Falcone

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A & B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kelly Campbell

Start Date

5-19-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

The present study examined the impact of love on athletic performance including whether differences existed based on love-type (passionate vs. companionate). Participants were recruited from the athletic department at a western U.S. university. The athletes completed four tests on two separate days within the same week period: A one-mile run on the treadmill, the Wingate anaerobic test, a timed core stability test, and stretch-and-reach flexibility. On a randomly selected day, they participated in a 2-minute telephone call with their significant other in which they discussed a recent, positive experience that was shared together. On this same day, they also completed an online survey that assessed their demographic and relationship characteristics, cognitive capabilities, motivation and values, competitiveness, and sport (e.g., individual versus team). Overall, the athletes performed better on days for which they were prompted to think about “love.” There were modest differences based on love-type with those in companionate love performing worse on love-prompt days than those in primarily passionate relationships. In terms of limitations, there are a number of intervening variables that may have influenced our study findings. Although athletes were provided with instructions about their eating and drinking prior to testing, other factors such as lack of sleep or testing before or after a midterm exam could have affected performance. Nevertheless, our findings provide valuable information regarding the beneficial effects of love on athletic performance, which contradicts the commonly held notion that passionate love or sex adversely impacts performance.

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May 19th, 1:00 PM May 19th, 2:30 PM

Does Love Impact Athletic Performance?

Event Center A & B

The present study examined the impact of love on athletic performance including whether differences existed based on love-type (passionate vs. companionate). Participants were recruited from the athletic department at a western U.S. university. The athletes completed four tests on two separate days within the same week period: A one-mile run on the treadmill, the Wingate anaerobic test, a timed core stability test, and stretch-and-reach flexibility. On a randomly selected day, they participated in a 2-minute telephone call with their significant other in which they discussed a recent, positive experience that was shared together. On this same day, they also completed an online survey that assessed their demographic and relationship characteristics, cognitive capabilities, motivation and values, competitiveness, and sport (e.g., individual versus team). Overall, the athletes performed better on days for which they were prompted to think about “love.” There were modest differences based on love-type with those in companionate love performing worse on love-prompt days than those in primarily passionate relationships. In terms of limitations, there are a number of intervening variables that may have influenced our study findings. Although athletes were provided with instructions about their eating and drinking prior to testing, other factors such as lack of sleep or testing before or after a midterm exam could have affected performance. Nevertheless, our findings provide valuable information regarding the beneficial effects of love on athletic performance, which contradicts the commonly held notion that passionate love or sex adversely impacts performance.