Event Title

Ethnic Varizations in Sibling Relationship

Presenter Information

Scott Foster

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A & B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Laura Kamptner

Start Date

5-19-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

Research studies have examined the impact of the sibling relationship on a person’s development, and have identified some of the factors that influence the sibling relationship including parenting style, age of the siblings, gender of siblings, and some aspects of family cultural values. However, studies have not examined, in depth, how ethnicity impacts the sibling relationship. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethnicity on the sibling relationship. It is expected that sibling relationships in ethnic groups with more collectivist cultural values (i.e., Asian American, Latino American, African American, Middle Eastern) are expected to be warmer, more supportive, and show less conflict and rivalry than sibling relationships in ethnic groups with more individualistic cultural values (i.e., Caucasian American).

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May 19th, 1:00 PM May 19th, 2:30 PM

Ethnic Varizations in Sibling Relationship

Event Center A & B

Research studies have examined the impact of the sibling relationship on a person’s development, and have identified some of the factors that influence the sibling relationship including parenting style, age of the siblings, gender of siblings, and some aspects of family cultural values. However, studies have not examined, in depth, how ethnicity impacts the sibling relationship. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of ethnicity on the sibling relationship. It is expected that sibling relationships in ethnic groups with more collectivist cultural values (i.e., Asian American, Latino American, African American, Middle Eastern) are expected to be warmer, more supportive, and show less conflict and rivalry than sibling relationships in ethnic groups with more individualistic cultural values (i.e., Caucasian American).