Event Title

Cognitive Training: Improving Low Working Memory

Presenter Information

Kristy Rendler

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A & B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jason F. Reimer

Start Date

5-19-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine an effective method to improve individuals’ cognitive abilities via computerized, targeted cognitive training. It was hypothesized that participants who were exposed to a memory-based, cognitive training video game, Recall, would show increased performance on a number of cognitive/visual measures, while those exposed to a visual processing task (Ultimeyes) would not. In order to test this hypothesis, a total of 34 participants were recruited from California State University, San Bernardino, and randomly assigned to two separate training conditions, Recall or Ultimeyes (17 participants each). Participants in each group were pre-tested on five cognitive measures, (e.g. SPAN task, MST, WRAML, AX-CPT, & MNREAD). The SSPAN and OSPAN each measured working memory (WM) capacity, whereas, the WRAML was used to measure verbal WM. The MST and the AX-CPT measured cognitive control, while the MN Read measured reading speed and acuity. Following approximately 11 hours of training, participants in both conditions completed the same measures used during the pre-test. Consistent with the hypothesis, participants who trained with Recall showed significant improvements on measures of cognitive control and reading speed. Inconsistent with the hypothesis, participants who trained with Ultimeyes showed improvements on measures of working memory capacity and reading acuity. Current research is further investigating which cognitive training methods are most effective for improving these cognitive/visual memory abilities in college students.

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May 19th, 1:00 PM May 19th, 2:30 PM

Cognitive Training: Improving Low Working Memory

Event Center A & B

The purpose of the study was to determine an effective method to improve individuals’ cognitive abilities via computerized, targeted cognitive training. It was hypothesized that participants who were exposed to a memory-based, cognitive training video game, Recall, would show increased performance on a number of cognitive/visual measures, while those exposed to a visual processing task (Ultimeyes) would not. In order to test this hypothesis, a total of 34 participants were recruited from California State University, San Bernardino, and randomly assigned to two separate training conditions, Recall or Ultimeyes (17 participants each). Participants in each group were pre-tested on five cognitive measures, (e.g. SPAN task, MST, WRAML, AX-CPT, & MNREAD). The SSPAN and OSPAN each measured working memory (WM) capacity, whereas, the WRAML was used to measure verbal WM. The MST and the AX-CPT measured cognitive control, while the MN Read measured reading speed and acuity. Following approximately 11 hours of training, participants in both conditions completed the same measures used during the pre-test. Consistent with the hypothesis, participants who trained with Recall showed significant improvements on measures of cognitive control and reading speed. Inconsistent with the hypothesis, participants who trained with Ultimeyes showed improvements on measures of working memory capacity and reading acuity. Current research is further investigating which cognitive training methods are most effective for improving these cognitive/visual memory abilities in college students.