Event Title

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Involuntary Detention in California Emergency Departments

Presenter Information

Tamika Hicks

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Health Science and Human Ecology

Location

Event Center A & B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Monideepa Becerra

Start Date

5-19-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 2:30 PM

Abstract

Background: Racial/ethnic health disparities are a major public health issue; with much of literature focusing on chronic conditions. Given the rise of initiatives such as Black Lives Matter, among others, evaluating such disparities in detention, incarceration, etc. is also necessary. In this study, we evaluated the racial/ethnic disparities in 5150 holds. 5150 is an involuntary psychiatric hold for 72 hours, placed by members of attending staff, peace officer, or another professional designated by the County. / Methods: The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), 2008-2010 database, which contains discharge data abstracts for every patient hospitalization from every ED in California, was utilized. Our study population was those at least 18 years of age, with primary dependent variable of 5150 hold and study population characteristics of age, race/ethnicity, sex, poverty quartile, insurance status, and other sociodemographic characteristics. Descriptive statistics, followed by chi-square and multivariable regression analyses were conducted with alpha less than .05 noting significance. Results: The study results demonstrated that Blacks and Hispanics were 57.2% and 154.5% more likely to be placed on a 5150 hold, respectively, as compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Similarly, females were 52% more likely to be detailed for 5150, compared to males. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates racial and ethnic disparities in 5150 holds, demonstrating a higher burden of involuntary detention among minority populations. Community-based resources for mental illness as well as policy implications to reduce unnecessary detention among minorities are critical.

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May 19th, 1:00 PM May 19th, 2:30 PM

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Involuntary Detention in California Emergency Departments

Event Center A & B

Background: Racial/ethnic health disparities are a major public health issue; with much of literature focusing on chronic conditions. Given the rise of initiatives such as Black Lives Matter, among others, evaluating such disparities in detention, incarceration, etc. is also necessary. In this study, we evaluated the racial/ethnic disparities in 5150 holds. 5150 is an involuntary psychiatric hold for 72 hours, placed by members of attending staff, peace officer, or another professional designated by the County. / Methods: The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), 2008-2010 database, which contains discharge data abstracts for every patient hospitalization from every ED in California, was utilized. Our study population was those at least 18 years of age, with primary dependent variable of 5150 hold and study population characteristics of age, race/ethnicity, sex, poverty quartile, insurance status, and other sociodemographic characteristics. Descriptive statistics, followed by chi-square and multivariable regression analyses were conducted with alpha less than .05 noting significance. Results: The study results demonstrated that Blacks and Hispanics were 57.2% and 154.5% more likely to be placed on a 5150 hold, respectively, as compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Similarly, females were 52% more likely to be detailed for 5150, compared to males. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates racial and ethnic disparities in 5150 holds, demonstrating a higher burden of involuntary detention among minority populations. Community-based resources for mental illness as well as policy implications to reduce unnecessary detention among minorities are critical.