Event Title

Emerging Adulthood and Resilience Study

Presenter Information

Silvana Johnston

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Session Number

2

Location

RM 215

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Christine Weinkauff

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Monideepa Becerra

Start Date

5-19-2016 2:40 PM

End Date

5-19-2016 3:00 PM

Abstract

Decades of research support the positive influence of approach motivation (Lochbaum et al., 2013), exercise intention (Hagger et al., 2002), selfesteem and mental toughness (Gerber et al., 2012), and certain personality characteristics (Rhodes & Pfaeffli, 2012) on an individual’s tendency to persist with exercise. Likewise, reciprocal relationships have been evidenced. For instance, it is well documented that exercise enhances self-esteem (Fox, 2000; Joseph, Royse, Benitez, & Pekmezi, 2014; Opdenacker, Delecluse, & Boen, 2009) and mental toughness (Crust & Clough, 2011; Gerber et al., 2012). The abundance of correlational data supporting these variables as predictors of exercise participation and persistence leaves a surprising gap in the research in terms of causation. Specifically, there is an absence of research considering the flipside of one of these relationships: persistence in exercise participation as the antecedent to approach motivation. To begin closing this gap, this study will use an 8-week exercise intervention with pre and post-test measures of approach motivation to see if exercise will result in greater approach motive tendencies. Additionally, this study will observe the role of nature and flow as moderators in the relationship between exercise and motivation. This study will focus on college freshmen. As these individuals assume the added responsibilities of college life away from their support systems, using or developing approach motive tendencies may optimize their potential to thrive (Updegraff, Gable, & Taylor, 2004; Urry, Nitschke, Bolski, Jackson, Dalton, Mueller, Rosenkranz, Ryff, Singer, & Davidson, 2004).

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May 19th, 2:40 PM May 19th, 3:00 PM

Emerging Adulthood and Resilience Study

RM 215

Decades of research support the positive influence of approach motivation (Lochbaum et al., 2013), exercise intention (Hagger et al., 2002), selfesteem and mental toughness (Gerber et al., 2012), and certain personality characteristics (Rhodes & Pfaeffli, 2012) on an individual’s tendency to persist with exercise. Likewise, reciprocal relationships have been evidenced. For instance, it is well documented that exercise enhances self-esteem (Fox, 2000; Joseph, Royse, Benitez, & Pekmezi, 2014; Opdenacker, Delecluse, & Boen, 2009) and mental toughness (Crust & Clough, 2011; Gerber et al., 2012). The abundance of correlational data supporting these variables as predictors of exercise participation and persistence leaves a surprising gap in the research in terms of causation. Specifically, there is an absence of research considering the flipside of one of these relationships: persistence in exercise participation as the antecedent to approach motivation. To begin closing this gap, this study will use an 8-week exercise intervention with pre and post-test measures of approach motivation to see if exercise will result in greater approach motive tendencies. Additionally, this study will observe the role of nature and flow as moderators in the relationship between exercise and motivation. This study will focus on college freshmen. As these individuals assume the added responsibilities of college life away from their support systems, using or developing approach motive tendencies may optimize their potential to thrive (Updegraff, Gable, & Taylor, 2004; Urry, Nitschke, Bolski, Jackson, Dalton, Mueller, Rosenkranz, Ryff, Singer, & Davidson, 2004).