Event Title

Exposure To Social Defeat During Adolescence Results In Depressive-Like Behaviors In Male C57bl/6 Mice

Presenter Information

Mirella Hernandez

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Biology

Psychology

Session Number

3

Location

RM 211

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Christopher Gentry

Start Date

5-21-2015 4:20 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 4:40 PM

Abstract

Stress exposure is highly correlated with the development of mood-related psychopathologies, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Since the first episodes of MDD often emerge during adolescence, we sought to investigate whether exposure to social defeat – a model commonly used to examine depressive-like behaviors in adult animals – would result in decreased social interaction and increased sensitivity to inescapable stressors during adolescence. To do this, we exposed adolescent male c57BL/6 mice to 10 consecutive days of social defeat (postnatal days [PD] 35-44). Twenty-four hours following the last defeat episode (PD45), separate cohorts of mice were tested on the social interaction and forced swim tests. When compared to non-stressed controls, defeated mice displayed depressive-like behaviors as inferred from decreased social interaction, as well as increased total immobility in the forced swim test. When taken together, our findings indicate that exposure to social defeat during adolescence will yield depressive-like behavioral outcomes, which suggests that this model can be used to investigate stress-induced mood-related disorders in younger populations.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 4:20 PM May 21st, 4:40 PM

Exposure To Social Defeat During Adolescence Results In Depressive-Like Behaviors In Male C57bl/6 Mice

RM 211

Stress exposure is highly correlated with the development of mood-related psychopathologies, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Since the first episodes of MDD often emerge during adolescence, we sought to investigate whether exposure to social defeat – a model commonly used to examine depressive-like behaviors in adult animals – would result in decreased social interaction and increased sensitivity to inescapable stressors during adolescence. To do this, we exposed adolescent male c57BL/6 mice to 10 consecutive days of social defeat (postnatal days [PD] 35-44). Twenty-four hours following the last defeat episode (PD45), separate cohorts of mice were tested on the social interaction and forced swim tests. When compared to non-stressed controls, defeated mice displayed depressive-like behaviors as inferred from decreased social interaction, as well as increased total immobility in the forced swim test. When taken together, our findings indicate that exposure to social defeat during adolescence will yield depressive-like behavioral outcomes, which suggests that this model can be used to investigate stress-induced mood-related disorders in younger populations.