Event Title

Identifying Microsatellite Candidates For Understanding Diversity Within The Local Callisaurus Draconoides Population

Presenter Information

SueAnn Neal

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Biology

Location

Event Center A & B

Start Date

5-21-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 2:30 PM

Abstract

Callisaurus draconoides, commonly referred to as the Zebra-tailed lizard, can be found in various desert regions of the American southwest as well as portions of Mexico. However a small local population can be found in the coastal region including an area adjacent to our campus. Callisaurus draconoides is a monotypic classification with multiple subspecies. The subspecies are differentiated through ventrolateral bar count, habitats and difference in fringes located on the hind limbs. (Adest, 1987) Current classifications are relying on phenotypic variations as genetic research on these lizards is limited. The most current studies available are focused on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) while nuclear DNA (nDNA) research is lacking such as microsatellites research. Microsatellites are base pair tandem repeats with flanking regions on either sides. The flanking regions, which are highly conserved, are the basis of the primers necessary for the amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which is utilized in determining the variable base pairs within a given species. Through recent research, eight polymorphic microsatellites markers have been determined for the closest relatives on the phylogenetic tree , Phrynosoma hernandesi.(Sim, 2013) Continuing research in determining phenotypically similar lizards that are within the same family, Phrynosomatidae, will be used to evaluate the possibility of additional microsatellite options. The primers established through this research will be utilized in determining the genetic diversity within the Callisaurus draconoides species elucidating the pattern and extent of genetic diversity will aid us in understanding both the evolutionary and possible management of these local populations. . Sources: Adest, G. (1987). Genetic differentiation among populations of the zebratail lizard, callisaurus draconoides (sauria: Iguanidae). Copeia,1987(4), 854-859. Sim, Z. , Booker, B. , Viengkone, M. , Davis, C. , Leung, M. , et al. (2014). Isolation and characterization of 8 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the greater short-horned lizard (phrynosoma hernandesi).Conservation Genetics Resources, 6(2), 443-444.

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May 21st, 1:00 PM May 21st, 2:30 PM

Identifying Microsatellite Candidates For Understanding Diversity Within The Local Callisaurus Draconoides Population

Event Center A & B

Callisaurus draconoides, commonly referred to as the Zebra-tailed lizard, can be found in various desert regions of the American southwest as well as portions of Mexico. However a small local population can be found in the coastal region including an area adjacent to our campus. Callisaurus draconoides is a monotypic classification with multiple subspecies. The subspecies are differentiated through ventrolateral bar count, habitats and difference in fringes located on the hind limbs. (Adest, 1987) Current classifications are relying on phenotypic variations as genetic research on these lizards is limited. The most current studies available are focused on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) while nuclear DNA (nDNA) research is lacking such as microsatellites research. Microsatellites are base pair tandem repeats with flanking regions on either sides. The flanking regions, which are highly conserved, are the basis of the primers necessary for the amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which is utilized in determining the variable base pairs within a given species. Through recent research, eight polymorphic microsatellites markers have been determined for the closest relatives on the phylogenetic tree , Phrynosoma hernandesi.(Sim, 2013) Continuing research in determining phenotypically similar lizards that are within the same family, Phrynosomatidae, will be used to evaluate the possibility of additional microsatellite options. The primers established through this research will be utilized in determining the genetic diversity within the Callisaurus draconoides species elucidating the pattern and extent of genetic diversity will aid us in understanding both the evolutionary and possible management of these local populations. . Sources: Adest, G. (1987). Genetic differentiation among populations of the zebratail lizard, callisaurus draconoides (sauria: Iguanidae). Copeia,1987(4), 854-859. Sim, Z. , Booker, B. , Viengkone, M. , Davis, C. , Leung, M. , et al. (2014). Isolation and characterization of 8 polymorphic microsatellite markers from the greater short-horned lizard (phrynosoma hernandesi).Conservation Genetics Resources, 6(2), 443-444.