Event Title

Differences in Recreationally Trained Male Soccer and Basketball Players on Balance and Stability Measures: A Pilot Study

Presenter Information

Nicole Sauls

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Kinesiology

Location

Event Center A & B

Start Date

5-21-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 2:30 PM

Abstract

Balance is an important skill in the execution of movement in sports. For basketball and soccer players, balance assists in the development of optimal performance. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the differences in recreationally trained male soccer and basketball players on balance measures. Methods: Nine males volunteered to participate in one familiarization and one testing session. During the familiarization session, the participants performed a dynamic warm-up, followed by three balance tests on the Biodex Balance System. The tests consisted of Static Balance (SB), Limits of Stability (LOS), and Single Leg Balance (SLB). Participants returned to the laboratory at least 24hrs following familiarization session and balance was assessed with the same three balance tests. The SB and the SLB test consisted of three trials at 20s each with a 10s rest between each trial. The LOS test consisted of three trials until completion of task, with a 10s rest between each trial. The SB, SLB, and LOS test measured degrees from horizontal and the LOS test also measured time to completion. All of the three trials were averaged for each outcome measure. A 2X1 one-way ANOVA was conducted to analyze differences between soccer and basketball players in SB, LOS, and SLB outcome variables. Results: There was a significant (p 0.05) difference in the SB and SLB variables. Following no group differences, groups w ere collapsed for SLB measures and a paired t-test was conducted between right leg and left leg balance, indicating no significant (p> 0.05) differences between right and left leg balance. Conclusion: These results show recreationally trained basketball players had greater dynamic control than soccer players indicating basketball players may develop greater balance while executing a variety of dynamic movements. Both soccer and basketball players had bilateral symmetry balance in their legs, which may be attributed to executing movements equally in each leg. Future research is needed to investigate balance measures in collegiate basketball and soccer players.

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May 21st, 1:00 PM May 21st, 2:30 PM

Differences in Recreationally Trained Male Soccer and Basketball Players on Balance and Stability Measures: A Pilot Study

Event Center A & B

Balance is an important skill in the execution of movement in sports. For basketball and soccer players, balance assists in the development of optimal performance. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the differences in recreationally trained male soccer and basketball players on balance measures. Methods: Nine males volunteered to participate in one familiarization and one testing session. During the familiarization session, the participants performed a dynamic warm-up, followed by three balance tests on the Biodex Balance System. The tests consisted of Static Balance (SB), Limits of Stability (LOS), and Single Leg Balance (SLB). Participants returned to the laboratory at least 24hrs following familiarization session and balance was assessed with the same three balance tests. The SB and the SLB test consisted of three trials at 20s each with a 10s rest between each trial. The LOS test consisted of three trials until completion of task, with a 10s rest between each trial. The SB, SLB, and LOS test measured degrees from horizontal and the LOS test also measured time to completion. All of the three trials were averaged for each outcome measure. A 2X1 one-way ANOVA was conducted to analyze differences between soccer and basketball players in SB, LOS, and SLB outcome variables. Results: There was a significant (p 0.05) difference in the SB and SLB variables. Following no group differences, groups w ere collapsed for SLB measures and a paired t-test was conducted between right leg and left leg balance, indicating no significant (p> 0.05) differences between right and left leg balance. Conclusion: These results show recreationally trained basketball players had greater dynamic control than soccer players indicating basketball players may develop greater balance while executing a variety of dynamic movements. Both soccer and basketball players had bilateral symmetry balance in their legs, which may be attributed to executing movements equally in each leg. Future research is needed to investigate balance measures in collegiate basketball and soccer players.