Event Title

Effects Of Chronic Fluoxetine And Paroxetine Treatment On Affective Behavior In Male And Female Adolescent Rats.

Presenter Information

Zachary Harmony

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Biology

Psychology

Start Date

5-21-2015 6:00 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 6:30 PM

Abstract

Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is currently the only FDA approved antidepressant for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents. Administration of paroxetine, a similar SSRI with regard to composition and mechanism of action, has been shown to produce suicidal ideation and behavior within adolescent populations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the differing behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine or paroxetine treatment. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (IP) injections of fluoxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg), paroxetine (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or vehicle for 30 days from postnatal day (PD) 30-59. On PD 60, anhedonic and anxiety-like behaviors were assessed using sucrose preference and lightdark box tests, respectively. On PD 62, anxiety-like behaviors were assessed on the elevated plus maze (EPM). Rats that received chronic fluoxetine treatment across adolescence consumed less sucrose and had lower sucrose preference scores, when compared to vehicle treated rats. Chronic paroxetine treatment reduced time spent in the light compartment of the light/dark box in male rats. Neither Fluoxetine nor paroxetine treatment altered time on the open arms of the EPM. Taken together, differences observed in the anhedonic and anxiety-like responses of rats following chronic adolescent fluoxetine or paroxetine treatment indicates that these SSRIs have differing behavioral outcomes on natural reward and environmental stress sensitivity.

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May 21st, 6:00 PM May 21st, 6:30 PM

Effects Of Chronic Fluoxetine And Paroxetine Treatment On Affective Behavior In Male And Female Adolescent Rats.

Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is currently the only FDA approved antidepressant for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents. Administration of paroxetine, a similar SSRI with regard to composition and mechanism of action, has been shown to produce suicidal ideation and behavior within adolescent populations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the differing behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine or paroxetine treatment. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (IP) injections of fluoxetine (5 or 10 mg/kg), paroxetine (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or vehicle for 30 days from postnatal day (PD) 30-59. On PD 60, anhedonic and anxiety-like behaviors were assessed using sucrose preference and lightdark box tests, respectively. On PD 62, anxiety-like behaviors were assessed on the elevated plus maze (EPM). Rats that received chronic fluoxetine treatment across adolescence consumed less sucrose and had lower sucrose preference scores, when compared to vehicle treated rats. Chronic paroxetine treatment reduced time spent in the light compartment of the light/dark box in male rats. Neither Fluoxetine nor paroxetine treatment altered time on the open arms of the EPM. Taken together, differences observed in the anhedonic and anxiety-like responses of rats following chronic adolescent fluoxetine or paroxetine treatment indicates that these SSRIs have differing behavioral outcomes on natural reward and environmental stress sensitivity.