Event Title

Effective Nutritional Labeling for Improved Self Control

Presenter Information

Sarah Lee

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration

Major

Marketing

Management

Session Number

1

Location

RM 216

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Marc Fudge

Start Date

5-21-2015 1:40 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 2:00 PM

Abstract

Food consumption has become an important research area due to the increasing number of health problems related to obesity and poor eating in general. The Nutritional Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) provides a framework to better inform consumers of food items, and since this act was passed label usage in general has increased over time. Previous research has examined the effectiveness of various labeling mechanisms but the results have been mixed. For example, the Percentage Daily Values, which are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, are commonly used in the U.S., but research has suggested that people typically find it challenging to understand nutrient information, especially when qualitative calculations are involved. Clearly there is a need for simpler nutritional labeling mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of one such novel mechanism (percent content by volume) on consumer ratings of the healthiness of food items, and ultimately, food choices. Preliminary results support the finding that presenting some nutritional content by volume does indeed affect consumer perceptions of the healthiness of some types of food items.

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May 21st, 1:40 PM May 21st, 2:00 PM

Effective Nutritional Labeling for Improved Self Control

RM 216

Food consumption has become an important research area due to the increasing number of health problems related to obesity and poor eating in general. The Nutritional Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) provides a framework to better inform consumers of food items, and since this act was passed label usage in general has increased over time. Previous research has examined the effectiveness of various labeling mechanisms but the results have been mixed. For example, the Percentage Daily Values, which are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, are commonly used in the U.S., but research has suggested that people typically find it challenging to understand nutrient information, especially when qualitative calculations are involved. Clearly there is a need for simpler nutritional labeling mechanisms. The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of one such novel mechanism (percent content by volume) on consumer ratings of the healthiness of food items, and ultimately, food choices. Preliminary results support the finding that presenting some nutritional content by volume does indeed affect consumer perceptions of the healthiness of some types of food items.