Event Title

A Dual Approach to Response to Intervention (RTI)

Presenter Information

Cynthia Britt
Melissa Esparza

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Education

Major

Psychology

Session Number

3

Location

RM 210

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Daniel MacDonald

Start Date

5-21-2015 5:40 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 6:00 PM

Abstract

Many well-meaning school sites implement an incomplete version of RTI. While proponents of the RTI model claim that emphasis placed on early intervention could prevent academic failure (Fuchs & Deshler, 2007; Hallahan, Keller, Martinez, Byrd, Gelman & Fan, 2007), advocates of RTI would be wise to directly address the common misconception that PBS is for behavior and/or RTI is for academics. RTI is most effective when it addresses both behavioral and academic concerns simultaneously. Most experts would agree that there is an inverse relationship, which exists between students’ behavior and their academic functioning. Students often become frustrated and act aggressively to avoid difficult academic tasks. The reverse can also be true in that the lack of social skills and emotional self-regulation abilities contribute to reduced instructional effectiveness resulting in one or more academic deficit. However, a dual approach to RTI can ensure that the delivery of effective high quality instruction at every Tier level is maximized. It is the purpose of this presentation to demonstrate the interaction effect between the two types of interventions.

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May 21st, 5:40 PM May 21st, 6:00 PM

A Dual Approach to Response to Intervention (RTI)

RM 210

Many well-meaning school sites implement an incomplete version of RTI. While proponents of the RTI model claim that emphasis placed on early intervention could prevent academic failure (Fuchs & Deshler, 2007; Hallahan, Keller, Martinez, Byrd, Gelman & Fan, 2007), advocates of RTI would be wise to directly address the common misconception that PBS is for behavior and/or RTI is for academics. RTI is most effective when it addresses both behavioral and academic concerns simultaneously. Most experts would agree that there is an inverse relationship, which exists between students’ behavior and their academic functioning. Students often become frustrated and act aggressively to avoid difficult academic tasks. The reverse can also be true in that the lack of social skills and emotional self-regulation abilities contribute to reduced instructional effectiveness resulting in one or more academic deficit. However, a dual approach to RTI can ensure that the delivery of effective high quality instruction at every Tier level is maximized. It is the purpose of this presentation to demonstrate the interaction effect between the two types of interventions.