Event Title

Creating A Model To Treat Refugee Children Dealing With PTSD In Post-Conflict Environments

Presenter Information

Kristen Ramos

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Geography and Environmental Studies

Psychology

Start Date

5-21-2015 7:00 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 7:30 PM

Abstract

: In post-conflict environments, it is easy to determine the physical injury or loss; however, it is much more difficult to determine mental injuries, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Signs or symptoms of PTSD may not be evident or may show up later in life, especially in children. The developed world established prevailing therapy, and with globalization those practices have spread to other countries. These remedies are developed in societies that are typically individualistic and focus on treatment of individuals; these practices do not take into account societies which are collective. These treatments do not address all the essential areas of culture, geography, or post-conflict environment, which could dramatically affect the success of treatment. This paper aims to collect and analyze data on the available models of PTSD therapy and post-traumatic resilience for children in both developed and developing societies. We aim to answer if the models of treating PTSD in developed and developing societies can be utilized by one another to improve mental health. A comparative analysis will clarify differences between the two approaches and aim at creating a comprehensive model of treatment for PTSD which takes into account cultural and geographical differences.

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May 21st, 7:00 PM May 21st, 7:30 PM

Creating A Model To Treat Refugee Children Dealing With PTSD In Post-Conflict Environments

: In post-conflict environments, it is easy to determine the physical injury or loss; however, it is much more difficult to determine mental injuries, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Signs or symptoms of PTSD may not be evident or may show up later in life, especially in children. The developed world established prevailing therapy, and with globalization those practices have spread to other countries. These remedies are developed in societies that are typically individualistic and focus on treatment of individuals; these practices do not take into account societies which are collective. These treatments do not address all the essential areas of culture, geography, or post-conflict environment, which could dramatically affect the success of treatment. This paper aims to collect and analyze data on the available models of PTSD therapy and post-traumatic resilience for children in both developed and developing societies. We aim to answer if the models of treating PTSD in developed and developing societies can be utilized by one another to improve mental health. A comparative analysis will clarify differences between the two approaches and aim at creating a comprehensive model of treatment for PTSD which takes into account cultural and geographical differences.