Presentation Title

Latino/a Immigrants: Social Experiences and Mental Health

Author(s) Information

Edson Andrade

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Session Number

3

Location

RM 211

Start Date

5-21-2015 5:40 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 6:00 PM

Abstract

Immigrants encounter a multitude of difficult experiences that may affect their mental health and how well they adjust to a new culture. Latino/as are the fastest growing minority in the US (Humes, Jones, & Ramirez, 2010); first or second-generation immigrants who are adapting to American culture comprise a significant percentage of this group. Previous literature demonstrates that promoting positive social interactions with immigrants decreases their anxiety of adapting to a new community (Potochnick, Perreira, & Fuligni, 2012). As foreigners, many Latino/as become victims to acts of prejudice, which is linked to negative mental health outcomes (Leong, Park, & Kalibatseva, 2013). The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how certain social experiences are related to immigrants’ mental health and their inclination to utilize mental health services. We will run correlational analyses to detect whether there are statistically significant relationships between the social variables and mental health constructs. To determine significance, we will examine the strength of relationship (r), significance level (p), and coefficient determination (R²). We anticipate results will show a positive correlation between mental health measures and acculturative stress, discrimination, and foreigner objectification. We also anticipate a negative correlation between mental health measures and social experiences like Familismo, social networks, and seeking mental health treatment. Finally, we predict that help-seeking stigma will be negatively related to seeking mental health treatment. Results can assist in developing adequate resources to a minority group who faces disparities in mental health care.

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May 21st, 5:40 PM May 21st, 6:00 PM

Latino/a Immigrants: Social Experiences and Mental Health

RM 211

Immigrants encounter a multitude of difficult experiences that may affect their mental health and how well they adjust to a new culture. Latino/as are the fastest growing minority in the US (Humes, Jones, & Ramirez, 2010); first or second-generation immigrants who are adapting to American culture comprise a significant percentage of this group. Previous literature demonstrates that promoting positive social interactions with immigrants decreases their anxiety of adapting to a new community (Potochnick, Perreira, & Fuligni, 2012). As foreigners, many Latino/as become victims to acts of prejudice, which is linked to negative mental health outcomes (Leong, Park, & Kalibatseva, 2013). The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how certain social experiences are related to immigrants’ mental health and their inclination to utilize mental health services. We will run correlational analyses to detect whether there are statistically significant relationships between the social variables and mental health constructs. To determine significance, we will examine the strength of relationship (r), significance level (p), and coefficient determination (R²). We anticipate results will show a positive correlation between mental health measures and acculturative stress, discrimination, and foreigner objectification. We also anticipate a negative correlation between mental health measures and social experiences like Familismo, social networks, and seeking mental health treatment. Finally, we predict that help-seeking stigma will be negatively related to seeking mental health treatment. Results can assist in developing adequate resources to a minority group who faces disparities in mental health care.