Event Title

On The Hunt For Adult Stem Cells In Drosophila Melanogaster

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Biology

Session Number

1

Location

RM 217

Juror Names

Moderator: Dr. Guillermo Escalante

Start Date

5-21-2015 1:20 PM

End Date

5-21-2015 1:40 PM

Abstract

Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. Oenocytes in adult Drosophila melanogaster function in lipid processing, storage and detoxification of substances in the body. They are analogous to hepatocytes in mammals, although we are finding that they do much more than their mammalian analogs. Adult Drosophila melanogaster have 52 cardiac cells that regulate heart tube function and rhythm. The importance of these cells in the function and health of the animal lead us to believe that these tissues must contain adult stem cells as a source for the renewal and repair mechanisms needed to maintain these tissues. The hearts and oenocytes of zero to six day-old adult wild-type male Drosophila melanogaster were used. Heart and oenocyte explants were first performed to ensure the cells were viable in vitro. The cultures were established using mechanical as well as trypsinization to establish which method would yield more robust and functioning cultures. Schneider’s culture media with 2% anti-mycotic and 20% FCS was used. Successful explants of the heart tissue were maintained up to six days and remained beating for up to four days. Once identification of adult stem cells in these tissues is verified, a culture of pure adult stem cells can be established in future studies.

Share

COinS
 
May 21st, 1:20 PM May 21st, 1:40 PM

On The Hunt For Adult Stem Cells In Drosophila Melanogaster

RM 217

Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. Oenocytes in adult Drosophila melanogaster function in lipid processing, storage and detoxification of substances in the body. They are analogous to hepatocytes in mammals, although we are finding that they do much more than their mammalian analogs. Adult Drosophila melanogaster have 52 cardiac cells that regulate heart tube function and rhythm. The importance of these cells in the function and health of the animal lead us to believe that these tissues must contain adult stem cells as a source for the renewal and repair mechanisms needed to maintain these tissues. The hearts and oenocytes of zero to six day-old adult wild-type male Drosophila melanogaster were used. Heart and oenocyte explants were first performed to ensure the cells were viable in vitro. The cultures were established using mechanical as well as trypsinization to establish which method would yield more robust and functioning cultures. Schneider’s culture media with 2% anti-mycotic and 20% FCS was used. Successful explants of the heart tissue were maintained up to six days and remained beating for up to four days. Once identification of adult stem cells in these tissues is verified, a culture of pure adult stem cells can be established in future studies.