Event Title

An Analysis of State Anxiety, Trait Anxiety and Procrastination in Relation to Perceived Academic Stress

Presenter Information

Kaylee Kono

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A&B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Eugene Wong

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

With stress being so prevalent among college students, where academic and social demands are high, it is important to develop an understanding of the factors that may contribute to inducing such a state. Considerable research has focused on the relation between anxiety and stress, while other studies have examined the relation between procrastination and stress. In an attempt to better understand the factors that underlie college students’ perceived stress this project focused on state anxiety, trait anxiety, and procrastination as predictors of perceived academic stress. A total of 67 female students from California State University, San Bernardino took part in this study. All participants were English speaking and at least 18 years of age. A simultaneous regression analysis was conducted in order to determine if state anxiety, trait anxiety, and procrastination were significant predictors of academic stress. The regression model was significant with the three quasi-independent variables accounting for 58% of the variance in academic stress. The results of this project provide strong evidence that students’ perceptions of anxiety and their procrastination tendencies are significantly associated with academic stress. Future studies will need to address these relations more carefully in order to support student success.

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May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 2:30 PM

An Analysis of State Anxiety, Trait Anxiety and Procrastination in Relation to Perceived Academic Stress

Event Center A&B

With stress being so prevalent among college students, where academic and social demands are high, it is important to develop an understanding of the factors that may contribute to inducing such a state. Considerable research has focused on the relation between anxiety and stress, while other studies have examined the relation between procrastination and stress. In an attempt to better understand the factors that underlie college students’ perceived stress this project focused on state anxiety, trait anxiety, and procrastination as predictors of perceived academic stress. A total of 67 female students from California State University, San Bernardino took part in this study. All participants were English speaking and at least 18 years of age. A simultaneous regression analysis was conducted in order to determine if state anxiety, trait anxiety, and procrastination were significant predictors of academic stress. The regression model was significant with the three quasi-independent variables accounting for 58% of the variance in academic stress. The results of this project provide strong evidence that students’ perceptions of anxiety and their procrastination tendencies are significantly associated with academic stress. Future studies will need to address these relations more carefully in order to support student success.