Event Title

College Students Self-Perceptions, School Behaviors and Their Impact on School-Related Outcomes.

Presenter Information

Carlos Ramirez

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A&B

Faculty Mentor

Dr.Eugene Wong

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

Test anxiety is a maladaptive psychological state that interferes with a student’s thought process and impairs performance while taking an exam. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability for self-efficacy and procrastination to predict test anxiety. Specifically, it was hypothesized that self-efficacy will have a negative relationship with test anxiety. In contrast, procrastination will have a positive relationship with test anxiety. Participants were females (N = 73) enrolled in a four-year university in southern California. Students responded to an online survey that measured their levels of academic self-efficacy, test anxiety, and procrastination. A simultaneous regression analysis showed that self-efficacy had significant predictive variable in accounting for students’ test anxiety; however, procrastination was not significantly linked to test anxiety in the simultaneous model. The results of this study has implications for college staff who work directly with students in that self-efficacy may be a focus of these staff-student interactions. Limitations of this project and future research directions are discussed, as well.

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May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 2:30 PM

College Students Self-Perceptions, School Behaviors and Their Impact on School-Related Outcomes.

Event Center A&B

Test anxiety is a maladaptive psychological state that interferes with a student’s thought process and impairs performance while taking an exam. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability for self-efficacy and procrastination to predict test anxiety. Specifically, it was hypothesized that self-efficacy will have a negative relationship with test anxiety. In contrast, procrastination will have a positive relationship with test anxiety. Participants were females (N = 73) enrolled in a four-year university in southern California. Students responded to an online survey that measured their levels of academic self-efficacy, test anxiety, and procrastination. A simultaneous regression analysis showed that self-efficacy had significant predictive variable in accounting for students’ test anxiety; however, procrastination was not significantly linked to test anxiety in the simultaneous model. The results of this study has implications for college staff who work directly with students in that self-efficacy may be a focus of these staff-student interactions. Limitations of this project and future research directions are discussed, as well.