Event Title

Benefits of Positive Thinking for Children: A Gratitude Intervention

Presenter Information

Anahi Angel

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A&B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. David Chavez

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

In the field of positive psychology, one of the most effective interventions for increasing wellbeing is gratitude. People who practice gratitude are happier, report experiencing less negative affect, and are overall healthier. However little research has examined these benefits for children. The current study is an intervention aimed to teach children to practice the skill of gratitude and investigate if benefits of gratitude apply to children. Participants were children ages 7 through 12, from low SES families, who attend the Boys and Girls Club of Waterman Gardens in San Bernardino. First, a pre-test was conducted measuring gratitude and positive and negative affect. Children were then exposed to scenarios of positive and negative thinking in order to help them understand the benefits of thinking positively. Then, children were asked to keep a gratitude journal in which they wrote three things they were thankful for everyday for one month, children were also encouraged to draw a picture. Once a week children were gathered and encouraged to share some of their journal entries, and to express how journaling impacted them. Three post-tests were conducted measuring all variables; two weeks into the intervention, immediately after the intervention ended, and lastly, a month after the intervention had ended. Implementing gratitude interventions for children of low SES families is important because they are already at risk for developing a psychological disorder. Providing these children with the skills to have a positive outlook on life is essential for their resilience, and the resilience of the community.

Share

COinS
 
May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 2:30 PM

Benefits of Positive Thinking for Children: A Gratitude Intervention

Event Center A&B

In the field of positive psychology, one of the most effective interventions for increasing wellbeing is gratitude. People who practice gratitude are happier, report experiencing less negative affect, and are overall healthier. However little research has examined these benefits for children. The current study is an intervention aimed to teach children to practice the skill of gratitude and investigate if benefits of gratitude apply to children. Participants were children ages 7 through 12, from low SES families, who attend the Boys and Girls Club of Waterman Gardens in San Bernardino. First, a pre-test was conducted measuring gratitude and positive and negative affect. Children were then exposed to scenarios of positive and negative thinking in order to help them understand the benefits of thinking positively. Then, children were asked to keep a gratitude journal in which they wrote three things they were thankful for everyday for one month, children were also encouraged to draw a picture. Once a week children were gathered and encouraged to share some of their journal entries, and to express how journaling impacted them. Three post-tests were conducted measuring all variables; two weeks into the intervention, immediately after the intervention ended, and lastly, a month after the intervention had ended. Implementing gratitude interventions for children of low SES families is important because they are already at risk for developing a psychological disorder. Providing these children with the skills to have a positive outlook on life is essential for their resilience, and the resilience of the community.