Event Title

Cytokine Central of Glioma Adhesion and Invasion

Presenter Information

Negin Baghdadchi

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Natural Sciences

Major

Biology

Location

RM 215-218

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Nicole Bournias-Vardiabasis

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 5:30 PM

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal primary central nervous system tumor, with median survival after diagnosis of less than 12 months because dissemination into the brain parenchyma limits the long-term effectiveness of surgical resection, and because GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. This sad dismal prognosis for patients with GBM emphasizes the need for greater understand of the fundamental biology of the disease. Invasion is one of the major causes of treatment failure and death from glioma, because disseminated tumor cells provide the seeds for tumor recurrence. Inflammation is increasingly recognized as an important component of invasion. In the brain, it can occur by activation of microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, or by tumor-associated blood macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesize that activity of the innate immune system in the brain can influence tumor progression by secreting cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we show that patient-derived glioma spheres undergo morphological and gene expression changes in response to TNF α that are associated with changes in migration behavior in vitro. The extent to which these are recapitulated in vivo will be investigated.

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May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 5:30 PM

Cytokine Central of Glioma Adhesion and Invasion

RM 215-218

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal primary central nervous system tumor, with median survival after diagnosis of less than 12 months because dissemination into the brain parenchyma limits the long-term effectiveness of surgical resection, and because GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. This sad dismal prognosis for patients with GBM emphasizes the need for greater understand of the fundamental biology of the disease. Invasion is one of the major causes of treatment failure and death from glioma, because disseminated tumor cells provide the seeds for tumor recurrence. Inflammation is increasingly recognized as an important component of invasion. In the brain, it can occur by activation of microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, or by tumor-associated blood macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesize that activity of the innate immune system in the brain can influence tumor progression by secreting cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we show that patient-derived glioma spheres undergo morphological and gene expression changes in response to TNF α that are associated with changes in migration behavior in vitro. The extent to which these are recapitulated in vivo will be investigated.