Event Title

Ketamine Exposure Attenuates Social Avoidance Behavior Following Social Defeat Stress in Adolescence

Presenter Information

Genesis Dayrit

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Biology

Location

RM-215-218

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Sergio Iniguez

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 5:30 PM

Abstract

Nearly 8% of children and adolescents suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, the current available pharmacological treatments improve symptoms in only a small portion of this depressed population. Ketamine, an anesthetic, has been recently proposed for the treatment of clinical depression due to its effectiveness as a rapid-acting antidepressant in adult MDD patients. Despite this, it is not yet known whether ketamine is an effective treatment for mood-related disorders in adolescent populations. Thus, to assess the potential fast-acting antidepressant-like properties of ketamine in juveniles, we exposed adolescent male mice to 10 days of social defeat stress (postnatal days 35-44) a behavioral procedure that it commonly used to study depression at the preclinical level. Immediately after the final stress episode, mice received either ketamine (20 mg/kg) or saline. On the following day (postnatal day 45), mice were screened for social avoidance behavior. As expected, saline pretreated mice (controls) displayed a depressive-like behavior phenotype, as inferred from increased avoidant behavior. Conversely, ketamine-treated mice spent more time interacting with a social target, and were less avoidant, when compared to their control counterparts. Collectively, this indicates that ketamine reversed the depressive-like behavior observed after chronic exposure to social stressors in adolescent C57BL/6 mice. As such, our data suggest that ketamine may be an effective treatment for adolescent MDD.

Share

COinS
 
May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 5:30 PM

Ketamine Exposure Attenuates Social Avoidance Behavior Following Social Defeat Stress in Adolescence

RM-215-218

Nearly 8% of children and adolescents suffer from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, the current available pharmacological treatments improve symptoms in only a small portion of this depressed population. Ketamine, an anesthetic, has been recently proposed for the treatment of clinical depression due to its effectiveness as a rapid-acting antidepressant in adult MDD patients. Despite this, it is not yet known whether ketamine is an effective treatment for mood-related disorders in adolescent populations. Thus, to assess the potential fast-acting antidepressant-like properties of ketamine in juveniles, we exposed adolescent male mice to 10 days of social defeat stress (postnatal days 35-44) a behavioral procedure that it commonly used to study depression at the preclinical level. Immediately after the final stress episode, mice received either ketamine (20 mg/kg) or saline. On the following day (postnatal day 45), mice were screened for social avoidance behavior. As expected, saline pretreated mice (controls) displayed a depressive-like behavior phenotype, as inferred from increased avoidant behavior. Conversely, ketamine-treated mice spent more time interacting with a social target, and were less avoidant, when compared to their control counterparts. Collectively, this indicates that ketamine reversed the depressive-like behavior observed after chronic exposure to social stressors in adolescent C57BL/6 mice. As such, our data suggest that ketamine may be an effective treatment for adolescent MDD.