Event Title

Utilizing Cognitive Training to Enhance Low Working Memory Capacity

Presenter Information

Mina Selim
Aaron Seitz

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation/Art Exihibt

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center BC

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Jason R. Reimer and Dr. Eugene Wong

Start Date

5-18-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

5-18-2017 12:00 PM

Abstract

Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of working memory (WM) training in young adults. Regarding far transfer effects, results have been inconsistent, with some studies finding evidence for far transfer effects (Au et al, 2015) and others finding no evidence (Melby-Lervåge et al., in press). In terms of near transfer effects, findings appear to be more consistent in providing evidence of positive training effects (e.g., Harrison et al., 2013; Melby-Lervåg et al., in press). The purpose of the present study was to extend these findings by examining whether neartransfer training effects can be found in individuals with low working memory capacity (WMC) using “gamified” versions of n-back and contrast sensitivity (adaptive control) training tasks. Participants were pre- and posttested (and compared to a no-contact control group) on measures of WMC, cognitive control, and visual acuity. The results indicated that there was positive near transfer of training to measures of WMC with the n-back training group and the adaptive control group. These results provide evidence that both WM-based and non WM-based training tasks may be beneficial for individuals who possess deficits in WMC.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 12:00 PM

Utilizing Cognitive Training to Enhance Low Working Memory Capacity

Event Center BC

Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of working memory (WM) training in young adults. Regarding far transfer effects, results have been inconsistent, with some studies finding evidence for far transfer effects (Au et al, 2015) and others finding no evidence (Melby-Lervåge et al., in press). In terms of near transfer effects, findings appear to be more consistent in providing evidence of positive training effects (e.g., Harrison et al., 2013; Melby-Lervåg et al., in press). The purpose of the present study was to extend these findings by examining whether neartransfer training effects can be found in individuals with low working memory capacity (WMC) using “gamified” versions of n-back and contrast sensitivity (adaptive control) training tasks. Participants were pre- and posttested (and compared to a no-contact control group) on measures of WMC, cognitive control, and visual acuity. The results indicated that there was positive near transfer of training to measures of WMC with the n-back training group and the adaptive control group. These results provide evidence that both WM-based and non WM-based training tasks may be beneficial for individuals who possess deficits in WMC.