Event Title

Enhancing Student Helping Behaviors through Secure Attachment Messages in Lecture

Presenter Information

Stephany Ramos

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

College

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Major

Psychology

Location

Event Center A&B

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kelly Campbell

Start Date

5-27-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

5-27-2014 2:30 PM

Abstract

Previous studies reveal that individuals with a secure attachment style are more prone to engage in altruistic behaviors. For example, a securely attached individual will act as a “caregiver” when he or she is in a presence of distressed individual. Without the need to fulfill egotistic desires, these individuals will do what is necessary to help a person in distress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether students’ willingness to help individuals in distress would be augmented after viewing Secure Attachment Messages (SAM) of secure attachment during lectures in class. We assessed 280 students enrolled in a Race and Racism course at CSUSB. Students were presented with (SAM) in alternating weeks as part of the Powerpoint lecture slides and their likelihood of engaging in altruistic behaviors was assessed. The SAM slides included images and words that were designed to elicit feelings of security, comfort and acceptance. The slides were displayed for approximately 4-5 seconds between the regular lecture slides. The students’ likelihood of engaging in altruistic behaviors was measured using a system called Top Hat Monocle. The altruistic questions included hypothetical scenarios pertaining to the likelihood of helping a student in distress. We predicted that the SAM would prompt students to think of their attachment figures (e.g., family members, romantic partners) and enhance feelings of security, love, and comfort, which would in turn increase their willingness engage in altruistic behaviors. Our hypothesis was supported. Students indicated a greater willingness to help a student in need on days for which SAM were shown in lecture. Results suggest that SAM are beneficial to student engagement and promote prosocial behaviors.

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May 27th, 1:00 PM May 27th, 2:30 PM

Enhancing Student Helping Behaviors through Secure Attachment Messages in Lecture

Event Center A&B

Previous studies reveal that individuals with a secure attachment style are more prone to engage in altruistic behaviors. For example, a securely attached individual will act as a “caregiver” when he or she is in a presence of distressed individual. Without the need to fulfill egotistic desires, these individuals will do what is necessary to help a person in distress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether students’ willingness to help individuals in distress would be augmented after viewing Secure Attachment Messages (SAM) of secure attachment during lectures in class. We assessed 280 students enrolled in a Race and Racism course at CSUSB. Students were presented with (SAM) in alternating weeks as part of the Powerpoint lecture slides and their likelihood of engaging in altruistic behaviors was assessed. The SAM slides included images and words that were designed to elicit feelings of security, comfort and acceptance. The slides were displayed for approximately 4-5 seconds between the regular lecture slides. The students’ likelihood of engaging in altruistic behaviors was measured using a system called Top Hat Monocle. The altruistic questions included hypothetical scenarios pertaining to the likelihood of helping a student in distress. We predicted that the SAM would prompt students to think of their attachment figures (e.g., family members, romantic partners) and enhance feelings of security, love, and comfort, which would in turn increase their willingness engage in altruistic behaviors. Our hypothesis was supported. Students indicated a greater willingness to help a student in need on days for which SAM were shown in lecture. Results suggest that SAM are beneficial to student engagement and promote prosocial behaviors.