In the aftermath of the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States government treated all people of Japanese descent as potential enemies. This paranoid world-view led to the “relocation” and imprisonment in internment camps of people (including American citizens) who had never been convicted of any crime. In California, over 2/3 of the people so imprisoned were born and raised in the United States. They were citizens. They voted, taught, started businesses… until they were imprisoned by their government.

The prisoners at the Assembly Centers and Relocation Camps published their own newspapers. Pfau Library owns a collection of the actual papers, as well as an exhaustive set of records (including the newspapers) on microform. (Housed under the title “Records of the War Relocation Authority, 1942-1946.) With funding from a National Parks Service grant the California State University’s libraries developed the CSU Japanese American Digitization Project http://csujad.com/collectionsmain.html. Part of the materials Pfau Library digitized for this project were our copies of the Poston Chronicle, which was the main newspaper of the Poston, Arizona camp.

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Submissions from 1942

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VII, No. 2, 1942, Unknown Unknown

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 25, 1942, Susumu Matsumoto

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 26, 1942, Kaz Oka

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 27, 1942, Unknown Unknown

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 28, 1942, Unknown Unknown

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 29, 1942, Susumu Matsumoto

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Press Bulletin, Vol. VI, No. 30, 1942, Kaz Oka

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Press Bulletin, Vol. V, No. 1, 1942, Susumu Mastsumoto

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Press Bulletin, Vol. V, No. 2, 1942, Margaret Hirashima

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Press Bulletin, Vol. V, No. 3, 1942, Isao Fukuba

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Press Bulletin, Vol. V, No. 4, 1942, Susumu Mastsumoto